Galaxy Watch Fitness Tracked: 72 Hour Update

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Day off from exercising, went to office for long meetings, during lunch went to Costco.

 

Fitbit Data:

  • Total Steps Counted: 10,054.
  • Total Calories Burned: 3,884.
  • Total Distance: 5.19 miles
  • Floord Climbed: 12
  • 72bpm resting heart rate
  • Active Minutes: 0

Galaxy Watch Data:

  • Total Steps: 7,726
  • Total Miles: 3.31
  • Calories burned: 481
  • Total Floors: 2
  • 77bpm average (92 max, 65 min)
  • Active minutes: 114 walking
  • Calories Burned: 481 (assuming this is from walking)

Notes:

Nothing Major to note.

Observations:

There was a BIG issue I noticed today and had come up in the past. That’s using the grocery cart and walking around Costco. As I was doing this, the Galaxy Watch was clearly not counting steps. The Fitbit was from time to time but what I couldn’t discern was if it was doing it because I brought it up to view or if it was actually counting while my hand was on grocery card. Since there’s almost a 3,000 step difference and more importantly, nearly a 2 mile distance difference, that’s where I’m going to note the two. It seems the Fitbit is just much more sensitive. Once again, that may be good or may be bad.

 

Galaxy Watch For Fitness: Tracked (Day 0)

 Introduction:

Over on Reddit’s r/GalaxyWatch thread, there has been a lot of discourse over the Galaxy Watch’s ability to serve as a fitness tracker. There have been several threads pointing to the Galaxy Watch just being not only inaccurate but just plain not working. I’ve been using a Galaxy Watch for about 4 months now that replaced my old every day watch (Casio WSD-F10 Android Wear). While I’ve never really questioned and/or cared about “fitness” performance from the Galaxy Watch, I’ve honestly only ever looked at the steps as a Goal, not meaning that I walked that specific number, but actually more like experience points that I needed to reach. However, since it’s the New Year, and of course, I’ve been a bit lazy it’s now time to bring the Galaxy Watch’s ability into question.

 

Over the next few weeks, while I work on my fitness goals, I’m going to be comparing my Galaxy Watch to my Fitbit Charge 2 and to a lesser extent my Casio. I’m going to ATTEMPT to use the Scientific Method here, but bear in mind it’s probably been a good 15-20 years since I’ve used it, so I’m going to use the 5th grader version and combine some steps. I’ll try to keep things and simple as possible and keep a journal on how it’s going. I’m going to evaluate it at the end of a 7-day period and give my summary. So, Let’s begin.

A Bit About Me:

So we all know what we’re working with:

  • I am
    • Male
    • 33 years old.
    • 6’7″ in height (79 inches)
    • 261.5 lbs as of January 15th.
    • Activity Level: Sedentary
      • There is some confusion on activity level, the consensus I’ve seen is that you put your day-to-day lifestyle in and do not count your exercise. Since I work an IT desk-job, that’s what I’m using.
    • Basal Metabolic Rate: 2,475
      • I did one that said 3,400 I didn’t like that number but BMR is based on an average, so I did a couple of others from around the internet. 2,475 seems a good fit.
    • Body Fat %: 27%
      • Technically, I’m obese. 🙂
    • My stride is about 17 inches when walking.
      • Feet per step: 1.4
      • Steps per 100ft: 71
      • Steps per mile: 3,771
  • Hardware I’ll be using:
    • Galaxy Watch 46mm (On my left wrist)
    • Fitbit Charge 2 (On My Right Wrist)
    • Casio WSD-F10 (On my right wrist)
  • Software I’ll be using:
    • MyFitnessPal
    • Fitbit Software
    • Samsung Health both on watch and the phone
    • Android Wear and Google Fit
    • Basic online calculators

Scientific Method Step 1 (Questions):

It it my purpose that I want to validate the Galaxy Watch’s fitness tracking abilities, evaluate, and determine the following:

  1. Is the Galaxy Watch Step tracker accurate?
  2. Is the Galaxy Watch stair calculator accurate?
  3. Will caloric burn during various exercises be similar to other sources?
  4. How is the performance of the Galaxy Watch compared to Fitbit?

I’m going to be comparing it to the Fitbit, mainly due to its popularity and of course I have one. I understand/realize that these evaluations are not 100% scientific, but at least evaluate it as best as possible for me.

 

Scientific Method Step 2/3:

I’ll be performing my own research, which is only a data point for other evaluations. Once again, this isn’t a peer-reviewed journal and I’m not going to research each devices programmed statistics, measurements, or any algorithmic performance. Just looking at numbers at the end of the day for me.

However, I will provide a Hypothesis:

  1. The Galaxy Watch will show fewer steps/stairs vs fitbit and fewer than calculated in trials.
  2. The caloric burn for the Galaxy Watch will be higher when compared to other sources, including Fitbit.
  3. The Fitbit will be higher when compared to other devices/sources.
    1. (This is based on some annecdotal evidence already, since I looked at my calories burned yesterday and it’s saying 4,400 calories in a 24 hour period.)
  4. Overall, the Galaxy Watch will have values that are lower, but at least are consistently lower by the same percentage. (Example, if I took 100 steps, GW would say nearly 60 every time. Whereas the Fitbit will represent more.

Why?

My assumptions above are based on some small evaluations over time. I have trouble hitting my 6,000 step goal on Samsung but can easily beat that on my Fitbit everyday even if I don’t try. However, I have noticed my sitting in my chair and from moving my arms the steps does increase while the Galaxy Watch remains the same. In fact if I stand and swing my arms my Galaxy Watch remained the same and the Fitbit increased by 10. (the number of each swings I took.) There has been some criticism about this stating that the Galaxy Watch doesn’t seem to pick of short little strolls. Mainly I just want to assist anyone else in determining if the Galaxy Watch is a valid platform for health tracking or at least for accounting for differences between it and other platforms.

Day 0 Summary:

Overall that’s going to be the pace for the next 7 days. I’ll do my best to update it everyday but at a minimum I’ll be updating them in 24 hour increments to account for my full days use. The data for today will be available tomorrow.

 

 

3-Way Smart Switches

The things no one tells you:

I’ve decided to take a quick break from our regular series: living in a smart home. This week I’m going to go over something that many people have asked about but also something I’ve worked on myself and had many questions during the installation: 3-Way Switches. I feel as though most home’s have more of these style of switches but that may only be due to the fact that most switches you either want to automate or control are 3-way as they’re typically in entry points of rooms and most rooms have multiple entry points. To preface, this isn’t necessarily an ultimate how-to guide but I will be explaining it along the way as best as possible. Ideally: YOU SHOULD BE READING THIS BEFORE YOU BUY. However, if you’re like me you didn’t bother searching for it until after you’ve bought them, you might be okay. So, strap in and hold on cause this one’s gonna be a long one.

Disclaimer:

This is only an amateur’s guide. I am not a professional electrician, simply a DIY enthusiast as many who read this are. Importantly, we’re working with a major shock hazard in your home. Please be sure to turn off circuits appropriately. However, I cannot gauruntee your safety and I do not how your home is wired. If you are unsure how or do not feel comfortable working on electricity I highly recommend you contact a licensed electrician to install your switches. If you continue reading and performing the installation, you would be doing so at your own risk and I cannot be held liable. Also, I recommend doing a regular switch BEFORE tackling 3-ways so you know what to expect. Utimately, you should contact a local professional for questions about proper code and wiring.

The Bad Kinda 3-way:

Now that we’ve tackled some of the legal stuff and the introduction, let’s get to learning. Once again, I highly encourage you to read this BEFORE you purchase switches, but I’ll give some pointers if it’s too late.

20170106_115425
This is what happens when you don’t look and plan ahead. 

 

Okay, cool… so what do you need to do first then?

Aside from you working with electricity and the dangers, the first thing no one tells you is to not buy your switches right away. The reason I explained in my last article still stands and that is that you should do your research first. Not only to find the best switch to fit your budget needs but more importantly which electrical connections are available. So, let’s go over your first steps:

  1. Turn ON the lights in the room and take note of which switch it is, especially in 4-way gang boxes. Also, locate the other switch that controls the same circuit and note of it as well. (Speaking from experience, I spent 3 hours installing and troubleshooting the wrong switch. I know it sounds dumb but when the power is off you cannot test this. Get a clear piece of tape and just mark under the switch.)

    dsc_0004
    A clear piece of tape is good for your memory.
  2. While the lights are ON locate your home’s circuit panel and cut the appropriate breaker OFF. The reason I do it like this is when you go back to the room, the lights should be OFF. This way you know you have the right breaker. DO NOT RELY ON THE MAPPING NEXT TO THE BREAKER.

    dsc_0008
    You can see I have made some additional notes. I’m not even sure what a Jazz Room is but my house certainly does not have one.
  3. With a screwdriver (typically a flat-head.) Remove both covers of the light switch(es). dsc_0005
  4. Many smart switches require a COMMON (aka Neutral) wire. They are generally white (but may not be) and there are generally a whole bunch of them connected together (or there may not be). If your switches are like mine BOTH SWITCHES will REQUIRE this connection.

    dsc_0009
    The elusive common wire bundle. (However, this a standard switch.)

    Typically a “remote” switch in my home does not have the common wire. While it’s not the end of the world this may prohibit or alter your purchasing decision. Head back to google and try to find some smart switches that do not require the common wire. Do some research. I cannot recommend any products as I haven’t used them and do not feel comfortable telling you so. In my case, I use GE Z-wave Smart Switches. These switches require that common wire. There are some out there that do not. However, I found many of them sacrificed something. So, see what works for you.

  5. There will also need to be “Traveler” wires that come off of your remote switch. Typically they are red but once again, they may not be.

    20161015_125739
    This is a great example of a non-standard 3-way switch in my home. None of these are standard colors. 
  6. You’ll also need to locate which switch has the power coming from this box. That is where you’ll put your primary switch. You can guess but be prepared for headaches. I recommend buying an inexpensive multimeter from your local home store to identify which one is hot. (More on this later)
  7. After you’ve done all that, replace everything and flip the breaker back on. Go online and buy your switches. For the GE Switches, you’ll need two. You’ll need the main switch that is their normal smart switch such as a GE On/Off Switch and also an add-on switch. These are what I use and can honestly recommend. The work natively with SmartThings and have some cool options.

    20161015_125412
    This way a 3-way “remote” switch to the “non-standard: switch earlier.  Noice there is no Common-Wire bundle, so in this case I could not use an Add-On switch without doing some additional wiring.

Okay Dave, I think I’ve got everything and ordered up my switches. Now what?

If you prefer videos, I highly recommend watching Jasco’s tutorials on YouTube just to get an idea of what you’re doing first. REMEMBER that they’ve minimal wiring in their boxes and they have it setup perfectly. Real-life isn’t perfect. My house had many different colored wires, so we’ll go over what mine had. Also, it’s important to look up other videos that simply explain how 3-way switches work. I personally prefer a more simple diagram since the lights are already installed:

yjotp

Here we see the HOT (aka Line) coming into the switch. From there, the circuit is designed so that no matter how your switches are toggled, they will complete or break the circuit. The reason I like this diagram is it also clearly demonstrates how the Neutral isn’t in the loop on the switches and are connected to the bulbs. Sadly, if your switches are like mine they will look like a rat’s nest.

Alright! Think I got it. Switches came in today, ready to install?

Yup! Hopefully, you have all the necessary connections (I’ll show what happens when you don’t) so let’s go through an installation. I’ll have a mix of photos since I’ve already installed all 3-Way’s necessary in my home but I’m adding the main switch to my bedroom. (The “main” switches are wired similarly except for traveler.) I’ll show you some of the add-ons as well. Since I enjoy nice ordered instructions:

  1. Once again, if they’re not already there. Re-label which switch you’re working on. It just helps.
  2. Cut the power from the breaker as before with the light on. This will help re-assure that you’ve got the power to the lights cut off. Remove the cover plate, then remove the switch.
  3. TAKE A PICTURE OF THE SWITCH. (It’ll help in case you have to abandon everything)
  4. Label the wires. Go ahead and grab either some white electrical tape or normal scotch tape will work. Wrap a piece around each wire and with a sharpie note which screws they’re attached to. (I label them: Top Left (TL), Top Right (TR), Bottom Left (BL), and Bottom Right (BR). Leave some space cause as we identify them we’ll note what they ACTUALLY are.

    dsc_0006
    Even though this is a two-way switch, I would still label the wires.
  5. Remove all wires and spread them out, now yell at everyone in the house to be careful and don’t go near them. Turn the power back on. Return to the wires, placing your Black lead on the multimeter on the GROUND wire (usually bare-wire OR green) touch your Red lead on the Bottom-Right wire, if you get a voltage reading of 120 AC volts that’s your Hot or Line, if there’s nothing, move to the other wires till you find it. It will go to the LINE plugin on your new switch. Go back and cut the power back off. Label your Line wire.
  6. Typically the other black wire above it will be your LOAD. You should also have a Red wire that is your TRAVELER. If you have either two Blacks or two Reds, you’re going to have to find out which is which. There are several ways to accomplish but really as in the diagram earlier, it doesn’t ultimately matter. (Once again, there are SEVERAL ways to do 3-ways. This is why when you go on Reddit everyone stays clear of giving advice because it’s a mixed bag. In the diagram above I actually have two travelers and the load is going to the lights off the auxiliary switch. So in my case, color doesn’t matter as long as it’s the same wires. To check this, wire-nut both wires together (not the LINE) and return to the aux switch. Using a continuity test (looks like a Christmas tree on your multimeter)  test the 3 wires in different pairs. You’ll see OL (Open Line) when there’s no circuit and you’ll see lights and/or a small ready when you’ve found the travelers. Add to your labels (on the aux switch) T1 and T2. The other remaining cable is your LOAD to your lights, label it so.
  7. Here’s where things get interesting. Now disconnect those two wires on the main. Connect the LINE wire to ONE of the wires and wire nut them together. Restore power. On the AUX side use your multimeter on AC Voltage, then put your black lead on the ground then your Red lead on T1. If there are 110-120volts, guess what? That’s now your new LOAD/LINE. If it’s on T2, that’s your new LOAD/LINE. (I’m using that phrase because the non-LINE wire on the MAIN switch will go into your LOAD port on the Smart Switch then it will become HOT when it has power. Speaking of power, go turn that off at the circuit breaker. So on the AUX side, take that wire (T1 or T2) and wire nut it directly to the LOAD. (Yes, that’s right it will not go into your add-on switch.) The remaining wire is your traveler. Add-on switches only have two connections. Traveler and Neutral. Finish wiring them as appropriately on the add-on side and main side. Traveler to Traveler
  8. BEFORE YOU THINK YOU’RE DONE:
    1. Connect the Bare/Green wire to the Ground on your smart-switch.
    2. Restore power and test to see if the switches are working BEFORE SCREWING THEM IN. I cannot tell you how infuriating it is to assume you’ve got it but you don’t. Once again, speaking from experience.
    3. Cut power and screw ONE switch in, test again. Also, experience speaking, sometimes you jog a cable lose especially when wiring the neutral in the wire nuts with 4 other wires.
    4. Do the final switch, yeah you got it. Test again.
    5. Now put the plates on.

Here’s a new MS-Paint rough diagram of what we’ve got going on now:

3-waysmart

The reason this works is because the Add-On switch has NOTHING to do with the lightbulb. Inside these switches are relays. Power is always going to them. When you work the Main Switch you tell the relay to connect/disconnect the circuit internally as opposed to the switches mechanical movement to complete circuits. The Add-On switch has a traveler line that is sending/receive a signal to the main to tell the Main Switch to turn off or on.

Whoa dude, that was a lot. Mine doesn’t look like that at all…

As I said earlier, 3-way switches are the bad kind of three ways. I’m going to apologize in advance that I cannot help everyone. Depending on the age of your house, if the builder was cutting corners, or they’re 100% up to current code you could see many different things and different wiring diagrams. My suggestion is as before:

  • If you don’t feel comfortable or don’t have necessary tools. Hire a pro.
  • Take pictures and label everything BEFORE you disconnect. It helps if you give up to be able to put it back as it was. (I still have a switch outside that I can’t get to work right cause I’m dumb and didn’t think about all this.)
  • Colors are never standard. While Electric Code is law, codes changes over time and rules have changed over the years. So, in your case think of Pirates of the Caribbean. “They are not really rules as much as guidelines that natural way of things.”
  • Speaking of code, if you wire something incorrectly or against code, you’ll have to fix it before you sell your home. You also knew about it and should be disclosed. So once again, look up your local code and try to make everything right. If it’s not right, call a pro.
  • When it doubt, Hire it out! It’s not worth it.

Got it, but let’s say I already bought the switches and didn’t notice I was missing a common.

As I said earlier, things should be done according to code. However, I made this mistake as well. Here’s how to get around it when you Add-On specifically doesn’t have neutral. Again, back to my awesome MS-Paint Diagrams:

3-waybypass

What I did was bypass the first switch and turned my Remote switch into the Main Switch. However, like a crappy Chess move:

  • You will either have a BLANK switch port
  • Or if you leave the existing switch there as a dummy, it does nothing. This confuses people especially guests and significant others.
  • Disrupts natural “flows”, by flows I mean when entering/exiting a room the light needs to be there. In my case, this works because the original room was a garage and it never made sense to between with.

Here’s the layout of the room which I got with doing this. Once again, I don’t recommend doing this but if you must and cause no one else told you:

familyroom_lights

In my family room, the Line goes into the original gang box then the travelers goto the other switch. However, the original gang box was inside the hallway, not in the room. So, when you wanted to get up to turn the lights on/off when watching tv, you had to go outside the room. So, you’d naturally go to the switch that’s inside room. When you come in from the Outside, I wanted the lights to automatically come on when the door is opened hence the automation portion but the light switch is still available there.

The only interruption to my original flow was coming in from the hallway. Bring in my Amazon Dot. While it’s annoying it’s not very often we need to turn the light on/off via that hallway switch (my wife didn’t ever do it from there either.) so after linking the switch through Alexa you can turn the room on/off or set the dim level from the comfy couch. This is the only reason it works with my family room. However, in rooms like my kitchen, I wouldn’t do this as you’re simply “passing through” most of the time to transition through the house and yelling at Alexa isn’t 100% guaranteed to work. I also can put a motion sensor in the hallway to have it automatically turn the lights on if entering but that requires some more advanced automation.

Okay… but what if…

As of right now, this article is 2,500 words. We had a lot to cover but I can’t cover everything. I’m SURE you’re going to have a lot of What-Ifs in this scenario. While I’ll do my best to help you I’m once again not a professional. Simply a DIY enthusiast. If you do have any questions I highly recommend going on Reddit.com/HomeAutomation and posting the question there. There’s TONS of helpful people (and a lot of know-it-alls be they good or bad) that can assist.

Also, I’m sure in writing this I made some mistakes, this document will be a “living guide” that I’ll update over time as people give me their input so feel free to leave any constructive criticism and I’ll do my best to keep it as relevant as possible.

Thanks for reading! Good Luck and See you Next time!

Living In A Smart Home Part 3:

Get Money, Buy Switches:

With big pushes from Google, Amazon, and many 3rd-party companies in the Smart Home realm we’re almost getting to the point where it’s actually useful. The purpose in this series isn’t necessarily a review or a how-to guide and you may certainly take it with a grain of salt. However, I wanted to write about the who, what, where, how and why in my home and maybe you’ll get some ideas of your own. It’s meant for the novice and the curious. It is for someone who is slightly tech-savvy and someone who isn’t tech-savvy. Feel free to use it as a “drunkenly honest” guide but remember that not everyone’s experience is the same and your applications may be different. With that being said, let’s get started with this entry!

Don’t make the same mistakes I did:

Last entry, I brushed upon your choice of Hub and +1. I recommended a hub by Samsung’s SmartThings. I just wanted to start out with a little support as to why. Receiving some criticism it can look like I’m favoring them and it’s pretty much true. I do obviously favor them cause I have them in my home. So far my experience has been generally positive. The devices I purchase for it work either out of the box or the community has written some impressive code to allow it. However, don’t take me as a professional blogger. I just do this in my spare time. I do not have the unlimited funds that CNET has. If I were totally unhappy with it, I’d change but it seems to fit the bill perfectly. Moving on from that choice I also recommended a +1, a smoke detector. Actually, I said to focus on a safety item. You’re more than welcome to purchase whatever you like. The reason I chose a smoke detector was to solve a specific problem, which was to be notified in case of a fire while my wife and I were away. As I said earlier, this blog is more of a journal-style and the things I encountered. Things I have deployed. Problems I have solved.

Dude, these aren’t problems… they’re wants.

A Reddit user stated that in the home automation there aren’t “problems”. I’ll respectfully disagree. It’s probably my mistake for not defining what I mean by problem but I implore you to take a “Problem” then “Solution” frame of mind. I’m referring to problems like in Math. (Boring, I know) “1 + 1 =” isn’t much of a problem, but it does have a solution. Part of my issue was shopping first. I knew I wanted automated lights, security sensors, automatic watering for my plants, automated sentry turrets… ya know the norm. What I should have focused on was solving problems. I would often see “Smart whatever on sale” and think, oh it just integrates into SmartThings, which simply isn’t true. There was a temptation to buy a whole bunch of switches and just change every one to be smart. (And not to mention costly.) There isn’t necessarily a need for that.

Okay, give me an example of a problem.

No problem! (I love puns) My first problem is my wife, (he said jokingly as his wife glances at him) not that she’s terrible person or anything but she’s actually the best case scenario for a good home automation setup and she keeps my grounded before I try anything extravagant. Whatever I do has to pass the “spouse” test, meaning if she can’t figure it out I am the problem. Specifically our front door was the problem. We came home late at night and our house was pitch black. She tripped over a shoe after trying to fumble to find which switch in a 4-way gang was living room light. Spoilers, it’s the one furthest from the door but try remembering that when you’re fumbling around.

Problem:

We come home late at night and it’s dark.

Solution:

Living room lights come on automatically when we enter the door.

Ah, but how to accomplish this? Well, my BIG mistake was going to buy a “Smart” lightbulb by Googling it. While this worked, it wouldn’t work with the light switch turned off. Remember my wife? Yeah, she turns it off and on to turn the light on and off. Guess what? She’s right. Home Automation and Smart devices need to feel natural. We’ve been programmed to turn lights on and off via a switch. We need to integrate our ideas with that. Hence the title of this week’s article.

Switches or bulbs?

In short, I will always recommend a smart switch over a smart bulb. There are a few exceptions though:

  1. You live in an apartment or rental and cannot make modifications.
  2. You do not feel safe or comfortable doing electrical work or do not wish to hire an electrician to do the wiring for you.
  3. You want different colored smart lights/moods.
  4. You have 3-way switches without the necessary connections.

This doesn’t cover everything of course, but those are some show stoppers when it comes to switches. (We’ll address #4 as it’s not always true.) Bulbs are great as well and I have no problems if you’d rather do bulbs just experience with people coming over is they’ll expect switches to turn on and off rooms, not apps or Alexa. There are other applications where bulbs may be a better choice, just not in any of the cases I personally have ran into.

Continuing our example, I ordered a GE-Z-wave On/Off Dimmable Paddle switch.

This was my first mistake and I lucked out. Always check your hub’s native compatibility list FIRST to ensure easy integration. I lucked out as it was supported by SmartThings, but I’ve ran into some trouble before. SmartThings is great cause chances are someone has already ran into the problem and there’s a solution but if you’re new I HIGHLY recommend checking first. When it arrived, I cut the power and took the plate off the wall.

Second mistake: BEFORE YOU ORDER: make sure you read about how they’re installed. In my case, GE’s Smart Switches REQUIRE a common-wire. (Generally white but could be any color). Once again, luckily I had that connection but I’ve got into 3-way switch installations without everything necessary being there. So once again, BEFORE YOU BUY: cut the power and verify you have all the necessary connections in both locations ESPECIALLY for 3-way switches. (I’ll write an article specifically about 3-ways since they’re very common in my home.) I wired it all up (well, I attempted to a few times and then found out what I was doing wrong) and was able to turn it on/off and finally sync it to SmartThings.

Using the Smart Lighting application on SmartThings I was able to tell the switch that anytime the front door was opened, between the hours of 5:30PM and 7:00 AM to turn on the lights. I’ll get into specific guides about this process later but in the main series I just want to address the big picture. We still had some problems based upon if the light was on already, however that came later.

Finally, I’d like to address one specific thing: It doesn’t make sense to automate everything or at least turn everything smart especially all at once. At anywhere from 30-50 dollars a switch that’s costly and you might not really see a benefit. A good example is my half-bathroom light. I COULD put a motion sensor in there and I could replace the switch to have it automatically come on when occupied then turn off. That’ll run me somewhere between $50-75$ dollars for the hardware. Or, I could just turn the light on and off when I go in like I’ve been doing for years. It sounds nice that you’ll save electricity but it’ll probably take a good long while before you see any return on that investment and most people have an instinct to hit the switch before you enter anyways. My recommendation is that you make sure that when you automate it actually makes sense. Use the problem/solution method, do research first, make a flow chart (coming later) on how that automation plays out.

Cool, but how did SmartThings know when the door was opened?

Sorry this one was a bit long but we had a lot to talk about. One thing I didn’t mention is how we got the door to be automated. While you can just buy a z-wave door sensor I went the more advanced route we’ll talk about next time: Your Smart Home Security System. Thanks for reading and see you next time!

 

 

 

 

Deal-Alert! Spigen selling S7/edge cases on the cheap!

phone-module1Thanks to a blog post by AndroidCentral.com, Spigen, through Amazon is selling quite an assortment of cases for your new Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge that you pre-ordered last week. No details on the en d of this promotion, but jump on them while they’re hot! Make sure you’re using the Amazon Prime Listing.

Please use the links below as they will give credit to Android Central.

Instructions: Click the link, add to cart, and upon checkout paste in coupon code:

 

Galaxy S7 Cases:

Galaxy S7 Case, Spigen® [Wallet S] Stand Feature [Black] Premium Wallet Case with STAND Flip Cover for Samsung Galaxy S7 (2016) 

Coupon code: ZKINZUPM

Galaxy S7 Case, Spigen® [Ultra Hybrid] AIR CUSHION [Crystal Clear] Clear back panel + TPU bumper for Samsung Galaxy S7 (2016)

Coupon code: RBUTFXSB
Galaxy S7 Case, Spigen® [Tough Armor] HEAVY DUTY [Gunmetal] EXTREME Protection / Rugged but Slim Dual Layer Protective Case for Samsung Galaxy S7 (2016)

Coupon: ORCII4EV

Galaxy S7 Case, Spigen® [Thin Fit] Exact-Fit [Black] Premium Matte Finish Hard Case for Samsung Galaxy S7 (2016)

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Galaxy S7 Case, Spigen® [Rugged Armor] Resilient [Black] Ultimate protection from drops and impacts for Samsung Galaxy S7 (2016)

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Galaxy S7 Case, Spigen® [Neo Hybrid] PREMIUM BUMPER [Satin Silver] Bumper Style Premium Case Slim Fit Dual Layer Protective Cover for Samsung Galaxy S7 (2016)
*This is the one I chose

Coupon: RBFD7EUJ

Galaxy S7 Case, Spigen® [Neo Hybrid Crystal] PREMIUM BUMPER [Gunmetal] Clear TPU / PC Frame Slim Dual Layer Premium Case for Samsung Galaxy S7 (2016)

Coupon: WLP9ZLDE

Galaxy S7 Case, Spigen® [Liquid Crystal] Ultra-Thin [Crystal Clear] Premium Semi-transparent / Exact Fit / NO Bulkiness Soft Case for Samsung Galaxy S7 (2016)

Coupon: D669P6MG

Galaxy S7 Edge:

 

Galaxy S7 Edge Case, Spigen® [Wallet S] Stand Feature [Black] Premium Wallet Case with STAND Flip Cover for Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge (2016)

Coupon: XW3QR5GY

Galaxy S7 Edge Case, Spigen® [Ultra Hybrid] AIR CUSHION [Crystal Clear] Clear back panel + TPU bumper for Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge (2016

Coupon: 8QNXC223

Galaxy S7 Edge Case, Spigen® [Tough Armor] HEAVY DUTY [Gunmetal] EXTREME Protection / Rugged but Slim Dual Layer Protective Case for Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge (2016)

Coupon: G4NQOG3H

Galaxy S7 Edge Case, Spigen® [Thin Fit] Exact-Fit [Black] Premium Matte Finish Hard Case for Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge (2016)

Coupon: AALT8PIF

Galaxy S7 Edge Case, Spigen® [Thin Fit] Exact-Fit [Black] Premium Matte Finish Hard Case for Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge (2016)

Coupon: OWQ8CMXZ

Galaxy S7 Edge Case, Spigen® [Neo Hybrid Crystal] PREMIUM BUMPER [Gunmetal] Clear TPU / PC Frame Slim Dual Layer Premium Case for Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge (2016)

Coupon: 7X77HYRN

Galaxy S7 Edge Case, Spigen® [Neo Hybrid] PREMIUM BUMPER [Satin Silver] Bumper Style Premium Case Slim Fit Dual Layer Protective Cover for Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge (2016)

Coupon: L3YVFPSO

Galaxy S7 Edge Case, Spigen® [Liquid Crystal] Ultra-Thin [Crystal Clear] Premium Semi-transparent / Exact Fit / NO Bulkiness Soft Case for Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge (2016)

Coupon: 4WLTCE66

Source: AndroidCentral.com

Confirmed: Samsung Galaxy S7/Edge Pre-Orders shipping early

Coming as aphone-module1 surprise so shortly after the announcement of the Samsung Galaxy S7/Edge at Mobile World Congress 2016, certain customers who pre-ordered are receiving shipment notifications and tracking numbers. I myself have even received a notification that the order was ready for UPS pick-up on  Saturday (however, as of 4 AM 3/1/2016 it has not left their facility). While it’s not a big deal, it is certainly a nice surprise to get it a bit early.

After receiving my S7, I’ll be posting my drunk review! Watch me get hammered then unbox the Galaxy S7.